Fishing Information

Where The Bassalo Roam


Have you ever thought why fishing timbers is so productive? Well, for one, most anglers don't want to fish them because they're afraid of losing a $5.00 lure. This makes it better for us that are willing to take the risk. Sure, you get those who will throw a spinnerbait on the top of the timber but the fish are in the timber. You need to throw crankbaits or pitch a tube or jig to catch the fish. Most of the fish never see a spinnerbait. Also everyone knows that the bass will use that cover to break free if they can, again losing a lure in some cases.

So, how do you know where to fish in a lake full of trees? Well, you don't pay attention to the trees to start with and look for structure below the surface. Creek channels are a good place to start. They are the freeways for bass. Look for points, road beds and bends. In the spring look for spawning areas. So, the first step in fishing trees is to use your topo map and depth finder. Once you fish an area throughly, then use the map and depth finder to find other places like where you caught fish. You will want to pay attention to the season too, different patterns for different seasons. Find cover that hold a variety of cover not just one type.

Trees that have vegetation nearby, different types of trees, trees by drop-offs are are good places to fish. If you have all standing timber and see one tree laying down in the water, then by all means fish the laydown throughly. Pine trees aren't really a good place to start, maybe they give off a scent but bass don't seem to like them very well. On the other hand cedar and oak are both good trees to fish.

Try fishing with a squared lipped crankbait that will reflect and have erratic movement when it hits something. Try flippin and pitchin a jig or tube. Get down to where the fish are, if you're not getting hung up, then you probably aren't where the fish are located. Once you start catching fish in timber then pay attention to the depth you catch the fish at, most of the time they stay in the same depth range in timber.

Fish timber, it's productive, find the bottom structure you need and get down to where the fish are.

Charles has fished for bass for almost 50 years. He has fished from Florida to California and has caught more than 6,000 bass in his lifetime. His biggest bass is 12 pounds 14 ounces. Charles has owned two tackle stores in his lifetime. He now resides in Ohio. Charles is webmaster for: http://www.bassfishingweekly.com


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